Stacy Willis

Stacy Willis
As a senior account manager, I am my clients’ biggest advocate. Nothing pleases me more than delivering real, quantifiable results to clients that help them drive more business. I have a diverse background starting in the technical world then transitioning into marketing. My background in engineering gave me valuable problem-solving skills, lightning-fast learning abilities and truly instilled a “get things done” attitude that serves me very well in the marketing world. I believe in coaching others to success. I approach all relationships, especially those with clients, by asking how I can leave that person more informed, skilled or educated than I found them. Empowering clients with new knowledge, ideas and skills multiplies success. I hold a B.S. in Computer Engineering from UCLA, along with an MBA from San Diego State University. Additionally, I hold a certification from the Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) Program on Information Security Fundamentals (GISF) as well as inbound marketing and Hubspot-specific certifications. I live in San Diego, California, with my husband, son, two dogs and three chickens (our little urban farm seems to add new members by the year). When I’m not working, I can be found outdoors running, hiking or traveling with my lovable little crew in tow.
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Recent Posts

This post was inspired by a client who came to us for help with inbound marketing fresh off a website redesign by another web design company. Over the course of getting them set up and looking into their website's performance, we encountered quite a few SEO red flags.

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To delete or not to delete? That is the question.

Let me paint a picture. You've been using HubSpot for a while now, maybe a year or more. You're coming up on renewal and the amount of contacts you've collected mean that you're looking at having to graduate to the next level of account type.

Currently the Basic level account allows for 100 contacts, Professional gives you 1,000 and Enterprise allows you 10,000. At renewal time, if you are above your allotted contact level, HubSpot gives you two options: either increase your account level to the next tier or stay at the same level and pay a little extra for the number of contacts that you have over the limit.

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Cyber security marketing is a delicate art that requires a constant awareness of and attention to your audience. It's easy to get lost in the weeds of the technical details of your product or service, confusing your potential customers and making them miss the bigger picture. But if you don't provide enough information, you risk omitting important details that might have been a selling point for your prospects.

This dilemma prompts the question: How do you find the appropriate level of technical speak in your marketing message? Just how much is enough, and how much is too much?

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If you're looking for ideas for your next cyber security marketing campaign, it's easy to fall back on a fear-based approach. After all, the state of cyber security is a little frightening these days. In 2015, for example, the average cost of a data breach for a company in the United States was $6.5 million.

It's very common in cyber security marketing to use fear as the motivator for change. Most companies fall back on this tactic as they often don't know any better. It seems like this would be the best way to get your audience to understand why cyber security products or services are needed.

However, we are here to warn you, scaremongering tactics rarely work in cyber security marketing — and here's why.

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The Guide to Creating Mind Blowing Content

Let's face it, there is a lot of content out there. How do you get yours to stand out?

Simple, make it mind blowing!

42 pages full of ideas for creating awesome content that converts visitors into leads and leads into customers!

When you go to the grocery store to buy produce, how do you select it? Do you look for the produce that is old, dry and withered up? Do you grab the greenest banana you can find? Or do you look for avocado that has just that right amount of soft smooshiness to taste perfect?

It's just like Goldilocks and the three bears: You want to find just the right mix of freshness and ripeness. Your website should be no different than your produce selection - you need to keep it fresh, but it's a balancing act - and it's time to start treating it that way.

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Have you been using your marketing automation tool for more than a year? If so, I’m guessing it looks a little something like a teenage girl’s bedroom. It is probably incredibly messy: clothes, shoes and make-up thrown everywhere, the bed and floor completely hidden from view.

The room’s owner may struggle to find shoes that match, distinguish clothes that are dirty from those that are clean or valiantly search for her cell phone amid the mess to no avail.

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If you're a cyber security firm, you know there is no "cookie cutter" business model to which you market your services. In addition, cyber security marketing strategies that work well for attracting enterprise-level clients aren't as effective when you’re targeting small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). That's because each audience has very different needs, goals and priorities, so you need to tailor your marketing message to specifically address each type of client.

Typically a cyber company will be going after one market or the other. It is very rare that a cyber product or service suit both enterprise-level businesses and SMBs equally. The reality is that budget constraints exist for smaller companies that don't with larger ones. The first step in defining a target market is really knowing which high-level audience your product or service is going to serve, because the messages to the two different markets are going to be vastly different.

In order to determine which approach to take with your messaging, you need to first understand the players you'll be talking to at both enterprise and SMB levels. 

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One reason that marketing cyber security to potential clients is so difficult is because all companies expect that their vendors should and will be "taking care" of the problem themselves. As a result, businesses don't do a good job of managing the risks involved in sharing data with third-party vendors.

When marketing your cyber security services to clients, educate them about the risks involved in passing their data to vendors. One of the greatest challenges in cyber security marketing is educating potential customers that cyber risk is not just an IT problem, but actually a business problem.

Your marketing messages should educate prospects and help them understand that cyber security is not only a business problem, but also, more specifically, a vendor management problem.

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