Stacy Willis

Stacy Willis
As a senior account manager, I am my clients’ biggest advocate. Nothing pleases me more than delivering real, quantifiable results to clients that help them drive more business. I have a diverse background starting in the technical world then transitioning into marketing. My background in engineering gave me valuable problem-solving skills, lightning-fast learning abilities and truly instilled a “get things done” attitude that serves me very well in the marketing world. I believe in coaching others to success. I approach all relationships, especially those with clients, by asking how I can leave that person more informed, skilled or educated than I found them. Empowering clients with new knowledge, ideas and skills multiplies success. I hold a B.S. in Computer Engineering from UCLA, along with an MBA from San Diego State University. Additionally, I hold inbound and Hubspot certifications. I live in San Diego, California, with my husband, son, two dogs and three chickens (our little urban farm seems to add new members by the year). When I’m not working, I can be found outdoors running, hiking or traveling with my lovable little crew in tow.
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Recent Posts

If you're a cyber security firm, you know there is no "cookie cutter" business model to which you market your services. In addition, cyber security marketing strategies that work well for attracting enterprise-level clients aren't as effective when you’re targeting small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). That's because each audience has very different needs, goals and priorities, so you need to tailor your marketing message to specifically address each type of client.

Typically a cyber company will be going after one market or the other. It is very rare that a cyber product or service suit both enterprise-level businesses and SMBs equally. The reality is that budget constraints exist for smaller companies that don't with larger ones. The first step in defining a target market is really knowing which high-level audience your product or service is going to serve, because the messages to the two different markets are going to be vastly different.

In order to determine which approach to take with your messaging, you need to first understand the players you'll be talking to at both enterprise and SMB levels. 

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One reason that marketing cyber security to potential clients is so difficult is because all companies expect that their vendors should and will be "taking care" of the problem themselves. As a result, businesses don't do a good job of managing the risks involved in sharing data with third-party vendors.

When marketing your cyber security services to clients, educate them about the risks involved in passing their data to vendors. One of the greatest challenges in cyber security marketing is educating potential customers that cyber risk is not just an IT problem, but actually a business problem.

Your marketing messages should educate prospects and help them understand that cyber security is not only a business problem, but also, more specifically, a vendor management problem.

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Are you getting ahead of yourself? Jumping into the deep end before you've learned how to swim? If you're just here because "conversion rate optimization" is a buzzword, and you think you should be doing it, turn around and walk away. You shouldn't waste the time and effort doing something if you're not doing it with a purpose.

CRO is just as much of an art as a science. And like any good art form, you have to make sure you have the basics in place before you start getting fancy. If you're ready to start optimizing right, and really derive value from your efforts, then let me help you!

This post will show you how to lay the foundation for a solid CRO strategy.

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Let's begin with an old tool to explain difficult ideas: a car analogy.

When you buy a new car, you also have to think about the car insurance you're going to buy along with it. Insurance coverage varies—there are a number of different types you can purchase, from plans that cover the costs of repair after an accident to comprehensive plans that also cover losses such as weather damage or theft. In addition, purchasing insurance doesn't give you a license to drive as recklessly as you want just because you know that your insurance company will cover the costs if you get into an accident.

Similarly, just as car insurance isn't a one-size-fits-all solution, cyber insurance is not the panacea to all of a company's IT problems.

Unfortunately, developing effective cyber security marketing strategies around cyber insurance is challenging because your audience generally doesn't completely understand what it is that they're purchasing. Many companies think they can just get cyber insurance, and it will cover all of the damages if their IT systems are attacked or breached.

This attitude, however, represents an extremely naive view of what cyber insurance is and the threats that companies face from holes and vulnerabilities in their cyber security practices. In order to successfully market cyber security products or services to companies without a deep base of IT experts, you need to emphasize the following three points.

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The Guide to Creating Mind Blowing Content

Let's face it, there is a lot of content out there. How do you get yours to stand out? Simple, make it mind blowing.

42 pages full of ideas for creating awesome content that converts visitors into leads and leads into customers!

Individual page conversion rate optimization is all about improving the percentage of users who meet a specific goal on a specific page of your website. One of the hardest parts of conversion rate optimization (CRO) is deciding what to change and test on a page. There are literally a million different choices and possibilities for what you could choose to adjust. And there is no point in randomly changing things just to change them.

Change for the sake of change is pointless and wastes time. So, in your CRO journey, there must be a reason behind each action you take, as well as a measurable outcome you are looking to achieve.

Step one is to make sure you truly understand and define the goal of the page you are working to optimize. If you don't know what you want the page to ultimately do, how are you ever going to try and improve the pages ability to do that thing?

So, how do you go about making the decisions on what to optimize or what tests to run?

You need a framework behind your decision making process. Each and every test you run should be based on attempt to answer one of the following questions.

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Your strategy for a trade show or event should never be created in a vacuum. It should always be a part of your larger marketing strategy and feed directly into your business goals. So, when planning for a trade show, make sure you're incorporating all of the channels which are a part of your normal strategy.

I've already talked about about incorporating inbound marketing and video into trade shows, so now let's talk about how you can make the most of social media at a show.

Just like any marketing strategy, your plan should be directly related to your goals. When deciding how to properly use social media to meet those goals, think about your funnel. Specifically you need a plan in place for reaching prospects at each stage: awareness, consideration, decision and even for current customers.

Now all you have to do is match your approach to your prospect's stage!

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Video and trade shows have always been seen as two separate parts of a marketing strategy. Like two different dishes in a meal, they are both delicious, but not eaten and enjoyed simultaneously. Well, ever since I was a kid, I was always the one to mix all my food into a giant pile and eat it all at once. 

And that's just how you can look video and trade shows. Yes, they function well enough on their own, but put them together and you have something that is even tastier. So how do you do it?

The most successful combined video and trade show strategy should be broken down in a linear timeline: before, during and after the trade show. Read on to learn how.

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I am always asked, "Stacy, should I focus on inbound or outbound marketing? Which works better? Which fits my situation?"

And I always wonder, why do we always force ourselves to pick one or the other?

When someone asks me if I want chocolate ice cream or cookie dough ice cream, I say, "Give me some Ben and Jerry's Half-Baked! Let me have the best of both!" It tastes so much better than either flavor alone, right? That's because, just like with any good recipe, the ingredients work together to create a much tastier dish.

Well, the same is true of inbound and outbound marketing. They don't have to be mutually exclusive. You can have both, and using them together can provide even better results than each of them individually.

So, let's talk about how you can integrate inbound marketing into your trade show strategy, a very common component of outbound.

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