Cyber security marketing is a delicate art that requires a constant awareness of and attention to your audience. It's easy to get lost in the weeds of the technical details of your product or service, confusing your potential customers and making them miss the bigger picture. But if you don't provide enough information, you risk omitting important details that might have been a selling point for your prospects.

This dilemma prompts the question: How do you find the appropriate level of technical speak in your marketing message? Just how much is enough, and how much is too much?

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If you're looking for ideas for your next cyber security marketing campaign, it's easy to fall back on a fear-based approach. After all, the state of cyber security is a little frightening these days. In 2015, for example, the average cost of a data breach for a company in the United States was $6.5 million.

It's very common in cyber security marketing to use fear as the motivator for change. Most companies fall back on this tactic as they often don't know any better. It seems like this would be the best way to get your audience to understand why cyber security products or services are needed.

However, we are here to warn you, scaremongering tactics rarely work in cyber security marketing — and here's why.

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If you're a cyber security firm, you know there is no "cookie cutter" business model to which you market your services. In addition, cyber security marketing strategies that work well for attracting enterprise-level clients aren't as effective when you’re targeting small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). That's because each audience has very different needs, goals and priorities, so you need to tailor your marketing message to specifically address each type of client.

Typically a cyber company will be going after one market or the other. It is very rare that a cyber product or service suit both enterprise-level businesses and SMBs equally. The reality is that budget constraints exist for smaller companies that don't with larger ones. The first step in defining a target market is really knowing which high-level audience your product or service is going to serve, because the messages to the two different markets are going to be vastly different.

In order to determine which approach to take with your messaging, you need to first understand the players you'll be talking to at both enterprise and SMB levels. 

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One reason that marketing cyber security to potential clients is so difficult is because all companies expect that their vendors should and will be "taking care" of the problem themselves. As a result, businesses don't do a good job of managing the risks involved in sharing data with third-party vendors.

When marketing your cyber security services to clients, educate them about the risks involved in passing their data to vendors. One of the greatest challenges in cyber security marketing is educating potential customers that cyber risk is not just an IT problem, but actually a business problem.

Your marketing messages should educate prospects and help them understand that cyber security is not only a business problem, but also, more specifically, a vendor management problem.

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The Guide to Creating Mind Blowing Content

Let's face it, there is a lot of content out there. How do you get yours to stand out?

Simple, make it mind blowing!

42 pages full of ideas for creating awesome content that converts visitors into leads and leads into customers!

Let's begin with an old tool to explain difficult ideas: a car analogy.

When you buy a new car, you also have to think about the car insurance you're going to buy along with it. Insurance coverage varies—there are a number of different types you can purchase, from plans that cover the costs of repair after an accident to comprehensive plans that also cover losses such as weather damage or theft. In addition, purchasing insurance doesn't give you a license to drive as recklessly as you want just because you know that your insurance company will cover the costs if you get into an accident.

Similarly, just as car insurance isn't a one-size-fits-all solution, cyber insurance is not the panacea to all of a company's IT problems.

Unfortunately, developing effective cyber security marketing strategies around cyber insurance is challenging because your audience generally doesn't completely understand what it is that they're purchasing. Many companies think they can just get cyber insurance, and it will cover all of the damages if their IT systems are attacked or breached.

This attitude, however, represents an extremely naive view of what cyber insurance is and the threats that companies face from holes and vulnerabilities in their cyber security practices. In order to successfully market cyber security products or services to companies without a deep base of IT experts, you need to emphasize the following three points.

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